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What is the State Bird of Nebraska? (And Their Facts)

Written by Clinton Atkins / Fact Checked by George Dukes

what is the state bird of nebraska

Every state has its representative animals, flowers, and mottos that are unique to the region. So, what is the state bird of Nebraska?

It’s none other than the Western Meadowlark. You’ll see these yellow birds in Nebraska flapping their unique-colored wings. It is a happy chirping bird that measures around 9 inches. Also, the Western Meadowlark is related to the Orioles and Blackbirds; they are family!

What does Western Meadowlark of Nebraska look like?

nebraska-look-like

Nebraska is a state with an area of approximately 200,330 square kilometers. It is not as large as the other states, yet it is rich with breathtaking scenery.

Did you know that the Western Meadowlark is not only Nebraska’s state bird? The Western Meadowlark is also considered an Oregon state bird, Montana state bird, North Dakota state bird, Wyoming state bird, and Kansas state bird. The Western Meadowlark is indeed famous and one of a kind!

The Western Meadowlark is among the common Nebraska birds. It has its own unique black and white color pattern, with a touch of yellow. This is the exact Nebraska bird identification of the Western Meadowlark.

Take a look at these pictures of the Western Meadowlark, also known as the black and white birds in Nebraska:

nebraska-bird-identification

Why Has the Western Meadowlark Become Nebraska’s State Bird?

Most Western Meadowlarks live in agricultural areas such as Nebraska’s grasslands, but they also roam the wild. Because Western Meadowlarks can be found in their area and have a chirp full of joy and happiness, they chose this bird as their state bird.

The Nebraska State Bird Facts

black-and-white-birds-in-nebraska

In a world full of many species of birds, the Western Meadowlark is one of the most beautiful and unique birds. It’s no surprise that many states have chosen the Western Meadowlark as their state bird. Let’s discover more about the Meadowlarks!

Fact #1: Western Meadowlarks are singers!

Western Meadowlarks can create noises that sound like they’re singing a song.

When you hear a Western Meadowlark singing faster, it signifies they are chasing. Using the low-pitched chirp indicates that they are upset, in mating, or simply in their territory.

Fact #2: Western Meadowlark migration

Western Meadowlark migrates late in fall but earlier in spring. They can be found in fields and meadows across the United States.

Fact #3: Western Meadowlarks are noisy

They say that before you see the Western Meadowlark, you’ll hear them first. That’s how loud their sounds are!

Fact #4: Western Meadowlarks are wheat and insect eaters

Since Western Meadowlarks usually live in agricultural places, like grasslands, they love eating wheat, seeds, and insects like grasshoppers, ants, and crickets.

Fact #5: Male Western Meadowlarks can have two partners

At the same time, the male Western Meadowlark can mate with two female Western Meadowlarks. When the eggs are laid, the female Western Meadowlark is responsible for incubating the eggs and raising the chick.

Fact #6: Male Western Meadowlarks are competitive

Male Western Meadowlarks are territorial. They will undoubtedly fight enemies by rapidly flapping their wings.

Frequently Asked Questions

yellow-birds-in-nebraska

What is the lifespan of Western Meadowlark?

The Western Meadowlark, which has lived the longest in Colorado, has lived for 6 years and 6 months.

The average lifespan of this bird is around 2 – 4 years.

Related: Let’s explore the state bird of Colorado here!

When did Nebraska get a state bird?

In 1929, Nebraska designated the Western Meadowlark as its state bird. This bird shares the same ancestors as blackbirds and orioles.

How did Nebraska get a state bird?

Nebraska had to wait a long time and go through several processes before declaring its official state bird. It must be approved by the vote. After the resolution was passed, it was signed into law and the Western Meadowlark was designated as Nebraska’s official state bird.

Conclusion

So, there you have it, the answer to the question “what is the state bird of Nebraska?” It is none other than the Western Meadowlark. The Western Meadowlark has its distinct color and characteristics, which makes them unique in its own way.

Be sure to keep an eye out for it the next time you’re in Nebraska! And if you can spot one, don’t forget to take a picture!

I hope this article about the Western Meadowlark has inspired you to learn more about the amazing wildlife in Nebraska. Happy birdwatching!

5/5 - (2 votes)
Clinton-Atkins


Clinton Atkins

Author

Hi, I'm Clinton. Rocky and I became friends after a birdwatching trip with our new group. And we have been enjoying every adventure together. When he told me the idea of establishing a site that shares our experiences and fun, I immediately agreed. After trials and errors, here we have Thayerbirding.

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